Archive of: Mountain Echoes

Issue

Title

July Issue 3 2012

The Angel of Procrastination is a thief

For most of us there is just too much to do these days and not enough hours in the day to do them — even with our long, summer days. The shed can get painted next week. Sometime after that we’ll take the broken lawnmower to the repair shop. The car’s oil change can wait.

July Issue 2 2012

Mt. Marathon — maker of champions

Anyone who runs the Seward Mt. Marathon Race in under two hours, or even finishes for that matter, is a champion in my book. I’ve never run the race, but I I’ve been tromping up and over and around the 3,022-foot mountain for nearly 60 years.

July Issue 1 2012

Do bear encounters come down to bad luck?

This summer — if you can call 50-degree temperatures and new snow at the 3,000-foot-level of the mountains on June 13th summer — there seem to be a rash of human-bear encounters that haven’t turned out very well for either the former or the latter. I suppose if we calculated the number of people out on the trails and the amount of area covered, we’d determine that the number of incidents is not that far above an average year.

Reaching new heights on Austin-Helmers Pioneer Ridge trail June Issue 4 2012

Reaching new heights on Austin-Helmers Pioneer Ridge trail

Branches of trees and bushes leaned down over the trail, bent by the weight of recent snows. Even after I had tapped the snow off the branches with my hiking stick, they still drooped low, blocking the trail and making me crawl on my belly like I was passing through a gauntlet.

Mountain Echos June Issue 3 2012

Mountain Echos

Bivouacked June 21 high on the flanks of Bold Peak in the Chugach Range about 15 years ago, I thought about this story from my boyhood in Seward in the 1950s when on Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, a friend and I sneaked out of our houses and prowled the town until the wee hours of the morning.

Snowy Crow Pass crossing elicits thoughts of early pioneers June Issue 2 2012

Snowy Crow Pass crossing elicits thoughts of early pioneers

On the morning of June 2, the Crow Pass trail was a world of snow as Pete Panarese and I trudged and slogged our way uphill from the Girdwood side. It was a brilliant sunny day with no wind and temperatures in the 40s.

Returning to Seward home, most things look much smaller June Issue 1 2012

Returning to Seward home, most things look much smaller

They say when you return to a childhood home, things look much smaller. Continuing the theme of physical space mentioned in a previous column, I recount a few memories from my childhood.

Biking to the coastal trail relatively easy — except for the headwinds May Issue 5 2012

Biking to the coastal trail relatively easy — except for the headwinds

I always wanted to see if I could bike from Eagle River to the end of the Anchorage Coastal Trail and back—roughly 45 miles by my calculation. I finally got around to it May 10 under partly cloudy skies and temperatures in the high 40s and low 50s, with green just popping out in the trees.

PEPPER PEAK, BIRD RIDGE, SOUTH FORK ARE RITES OF SPRING May Issue 4 2012

PEPPER PEAK, BIRD RIDGE, SOUTH FORK ARE RITES OF SPRING

Climbing south-facing slopes like 5,450-foot Pepper Peak above Eklutna Lake, 3,600-foot Bird Ridge overlooking Turnagain Arm and 5,001-foot Harp Mountain in South Fork have become annual rites of Spring for Southcentral Alaska scramblers. In April and May these mountains provide a nice sun break after the long winter and serve as good conditioning hikes for future summer outings.

Do we control our “stuff,” or does  it control us? May Issue 3 2012

Do we control our “stuff,” or does it control us?

One of the funniest bits I ever heard by the late comedian George Carlin was the one on “stuff,” the material possessions that we so dearly prize and covet. He talked about how we meticulously have our ‘stuff’ arranged and displayed in our homes, in hierarchical fashion, and how when we travel we take some of our ‘stuff’ with us, kind of “satellite” to our stuff, so that we have familiar surroundings and don’t get homesick for the main body of ‘stuff’ we keep at home.