Senate confirms John B. Owen to Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals


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The United States Senate confirmed President Obama’s nomination of Los Angeles attorney John B. Owens to serve as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Confirmation came by a vote of 56-43.

Owens was first nominated for the judgeship on August 1, 2013, but the Senate did not act on the nomination during the last session of Congress. He was renominated by the president on January 6 and reported to the Senate floor on January 16. He will fill a judgeship vacant since December 31, 2004, when Judge Stephen Trott assumed senior status.

“We are gratified that the Senate has taken action to fill this long empty seat on our bench,” said Ninth Circuit Chief Judge Alex Kozinski. “Mr. Owens is eminently qualified and I expect he will make a substantial contribution to the work of our court.”

Mr. Owens, 42, has been a litigation partner in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP since January 2012. His practice focuses on representing individuals and corporations in government investigations, and conducting internal investigations into allegations of corporate misconduct.

Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Owens served for 11 years as a federal prosecutor, focusing on white collar and border crime cases. He worked as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Central District of California in Los Angeles from 2001 to 2004, when he transferred to the Southern District of California in San Diego. He became chief of the Criminal Division in the Southern District in 2010, overseeing all criminal prosecutions in one of the busiest and most productive U.S. attorney offices in the nation.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals hears appeals of cases decided by executive branch agencies and federal trial courts in nine western states and two Pacific Island jurisdictions.

The court normally meets monthly in Seattle, Washington; San Francisco, California; and Pasadena, California; every other month in Portland, Oregon; three times per year in Honolulu, Hawaii; and twice a year in Anchorage.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit had 12,826 new case filings in fiscal year 2013. The United States Senate confirmed President Obama’s nomination of Los Angeles attorney John B. Owens to serve as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Confirmation came by a vote of 56-43.

Owens was first nominated for the judgeship on August 1, 2013, but the Senate did not act on the nomination during the last session of Congress. He was renominated by the president on January 6 and reported to the Senate floor on January 16. He will fill a judgeship vacant since December 31, 2004, when Judge Stephen Trott assumed senior status.

Mr. Owens, 42, has been a litigation partner in the Los Angeles office of Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP since January 2012. His practice focuses on representing individuals and corporations in government investigations, and conducting internal investigations into allegations of corporate misconduct.

Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Owens served for 11 years as a federal prosecutor, focusing on white collar and border crime cases. He worked as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Central District of California in Los Angeles from 2001 to 2004, when he transferred to the Southern District of California in San Diego. He became chief of the Criminal Division in the Southern District in 2010, overseeing all criminal prosecutions in one of the busiest and most productive U.S. attorney offices in the nation.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals hears appeals of cases decided by executive branch agencies and federal trial courts in nine western states and two Pacific Island jurisdictions.

The court normally meets monthly in Seattle, Washington; San Francisco, California; and Pasadena, California; every other month in Portland, Oregon; three times per year in Honolulu, Hawaii; and twice a year in Anchorage.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit had 12,826 new case filings in fiscal year 2013. 

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