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Archive » Recreation

For the birds

For the birds

It’s early Sunday morning and I’m sitting in the front of an SUV, creeping around Eagle River with a team of people I’ve just met: Tracy Lohman and her son, Lucas, 11, and his teacher, Kelsey Chalker, all who have driven in from Anchorage.

Morris Communications presents “The case for conserving the Kenai king salmon”

For many years we have watched the ebb and flow of salmon in Alaska’s waters; in particular, the great king salmon and the world’s greatest salmon fishery, the Kenai River. Salmon of all types play a major role in the life and wellbeing of our state. They provide food, subsistence, income, commercial activity and sport.
Kings in cycle: Salmon populations follow boom and bust pattern

Kings in cycle: Salmon populations follow boom and bust pattern

Dena’ina tradition holds that each spring when the Golden Crown Sparrow warbles its distinctive three-note song the first of the five Pacific salmon runs to the Cook Inlet have arrived.
State Fair open for fun

State Fair open for fun

Fishing heating up

Fishing heating up

STAR PHOTO by Matt Tunseth Eagle River’s Josh James, 15, fishes in Lower Fire Lake on Monday, June 10, 2013.
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Archive » Mountain Echos

Extended autumn offers great hiking, and perhaps some healing

Extended autumn offers great hiking, and perhaps some healing

These snow-free Novembers don’t roll around that often, and with unseasonably balmy temperatures (compared to some Lower 48 states), we should be getting outdoors as often as possible to enjoy the sun before it begins hiding below the horizon.
Polar inversion warms Southcentral Alaska

Polar inversion warms Southcentral Alaska

Eagle River resident Andrew North is waiting for snow. “It’s very strange,” he said of the unusually warm, low-precipitation winter Southcentral Alaska’s been having. “I normally would appreciate if there was snow down. That means there’s more activities to do outside.”
Memories are found during hike to Lost Lake

Memories are found during hike to Lost Lake

It was a clear and cold morning of Oct. 7 as friend Radu Girbacea and I began a 14-mile traverse of the Lost Lake Trail on the Kenai Peninsula, in Chugach National Forest. After stashing a car at the south end of the trail at Mile 5 of the Seward Highway, we drove back to Primrose at Mile 18, by Kenai Lake, to begin our hike.
Capturing autumn, the fleeting season

Capturing autumn, the fleeting season

Autumn seems to rush past us like a gust of wind, and try as we might, it’s difficult if not impossible to prolong it so we can savor the brilliant colors, brisk mornings and snow-dusted mountain tops.
As daylight ebbs, hiking safety is paramount

As daylight ebbs, hiking safety is paramount

During this transition from summer to autumn and then winter, the rapidly diminishing daylight can sneak up on us. As we lose more than 35 minutes of daylight per week, it’s not uncommon to find ourselves scurrying and stumbling along the trail in an attempt to beat the darkness.
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