Matt Tunseth

Peters Creek was overflowing its banks Tuesday as ice jams caused running water to flow down Aurora Borealis Road.

A National Weather Service employee first reported the minor flooding Monday evening, and the service issued a brief statement warning people of the hazard.

“Minor flooding is occurring below (northwest of) the Starner Street bridge along Peters Creek,” read the statement. “The river is at or just over bankfull, and some water is over Aurora Borealis Road.”

A fresh shipment of holiday cheer is on its way to U.S. troops stationed overseas via the sentiments of Alaska’s schoolchildren and the work of some stateside supporters.

An all-volunteer effort organized by the Alaska Veterans Museum, this year’s project generated about 10,000 cards and letters from students at 34 schools in the Anchorage School District. The cards are written by kids just in advance of the holidays and distributed by the national Friends of Our Troops organization.

Winter is here.

Ice fishing huts and Nordic ski tracks have recently started to appear around Chugiak-Eagle River, heralding the onset of true winter.

Civilian crime fighting efforts continue to expand in Chugiak-Eagle River, where Anchorage Assembly member Amy Demboski is spearheading a new coordinated neighborhood watch program to supplement the work being done by the five-person Birchwood Community Patrol.

Santa’s helpers have been busily hanging Christmas decorations and stringing up lights at a Boy Scout camp in Chugiak, which for the second year is being transformed into a temporary holiday village.

“We’re putting on the final touches,” Christmas Towne owner Cortney Moore said Monday, four days before the annual venture opens on Black Friday.

Moore started Christmas Towne last year with her husband, Jason, as a way to spread Christmas cheer and create a place where children could experience “something magical,” she said.

Douglas Frey would rather be safe than sorry.

“I shred everything,” Frey told the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce during its biweekly luncheon Nov. 15 at the Eagle River Ale House.

Frey is a vice president at Northrim Bank, where he’s in charge of security and business continuity. It’s a job that puts Frey in constant contact with some of the worst actors on the Internet — and there’s a lot of them out there.

“The threats that we face are constantly changing,” Frey told the chamber.

People in Chugiak really, really don’t like a proposal to allow for higher density housing on a parcel of land located near the McDonald Center in Eagle River.

At its Nov. 16 meeting, the Chugiak Community Council renewed its objection to the much-maligned proposal by the Heritage Land Bank board of directors, which will go before the municipal Planning and Zoning Commission Dec. 11.

“Heritage Land Bank is proceeding along just as they planned,” said Sandy Quimby, who has been an opponent of the proposal since she first learned of it more than a year ago.

An advisory board representing Chugiak-Eagle River area community councils renewed its objection to plans by the Heritage Land Bank to change the allowable housing density on 92 acres of municipal owned land in Eagle River.

At its Saturday, Oct. 28 meeting at the Eagle River Town Center, the Chugiak-Eagle River Advisory Board voted unanimously to oppose any changes to increase housing density in the Carol Creek Site Specific Land Use Plan.

When was the last time you checked your phone? If you’re reading this article, there’s a good chance you’re doing it right now — more than 60 percent of Star readers now get their news from a mobile device; if not, it’s likely you looked at the device in the last hour — studies show Americans check their devices dozens to hundreds of times per day.

The use of screened devices has become ingrained in modern society, and that’s especially true among teens, who according to the Pew Research Center send an average 30 text messages a day.

After a year and a half as executive director of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce, Dana Thorp-Patterson is going back to school.

Thorp-Patterson said Monday she’s accepted a job at Rogue Community College in Oregon, where she’ll be tasked with building the college’s workforce development program.

“It’s kind of an unexpected deal,” she said. “It just turned out to be too good to pass up.”

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