Matt Tunseth

In more than two decades running the Harry J. McDonald Center in Eagle River, facility manager Reid McDonald has never had to deal with the kind of mischief he’s put up with this spring.

“In my 21 years there we’ve never really been hit by any type of vandalism,” McDonald said May 14 at the Eagle River/Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors meeting.

Police were keeping close watch on a cow moose with two calves alongside the Glenn Highway Bike Path on Sunday, May 20, 2018. The mama moose bluff-charged officers several times as they tried to keep it separated from participants in the Gold Nugget Triathlon, which drew hundreds of cyclists to the area.

A fire left six people without a home Sunday evening in Chugiak.

According to Chugiak Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department assistant chief Clifton Dalton, the fire was reported at 5:47 p.m. and firefighters arrived from the nearby CVFRD Station 35 on the Old Glenn Highway two minutes later. When crews arrived, Dalton said the home was about 50 percent engulfed in flames.

“It took us about 45 minutes to get it under control,” he said.

Led by a statement performance by one of the state’s best long distance runners, the Chugiak boys track and field team did something it hasn’t done in a long time.

The Mustangs won the Cook Inlet Conference boys team title for the first time 1996, outrunning defending champion Bartlett behind a triple win from junior Daniel Bausch.

It’s time to start thinking Bear Paw.

Entries are being taken for the festival’s 11th annual photo contest, which each year awards cash prizes for photo entries in a variety of categories and age groups.

This year’s categories include Eagle River, People, Scenic, Fauna (animals), Flora (plants), Cultural (reflects the many diverse ethnicities/cultures present in Alaska), Creative (modified or heavily processed images) and Open (for youth entries). There are three age groups, including Youth (12 and under), Teen (13-17) and adult (18+).

Cliff Cook’s one-man community watch program is no longer a solo effort.

In fact, the six-month-old Eagle River Community Patrol has already grown to a half-dozen members and has almost $1,000 in the bank.

“We are well on our way to becoming a nonprofit sooner than I thought,” Cook said during a meeting of the Eagle River Community Council on May 10 at the Eagle River Town Center building.

A long-dreamed-of plan to bring a veterans’ housing facility to the Chugiak-Eagle River area has received the endorsement of the Anchorage Assembly — with the caveat developers work in tandem with local residents.

Local girls hockey players have a team to call their own. Now all they need is a name.

The Mustang Hockey Association is re-branding its revived girls hockey program with something more in keeping with the times.

“We wanted these players to stand out and have a distinct logo,” said MHA girls hockey coordinator Angela Unruh.

Digging in the dirt is usually a dog’s job, but on Saturday in Chugiak a handful of human volunteers took tools into their own paws to help out their canine friends.

“I like to get dirty,” volunteer Melissa Rigas said, a dirt-covered pickaxe resting at her side.

Rigas and a half-dozen others were drawn to the nonprofit’s 2.5-acre property off Birchwood Loop for a simple reason.

“It’s all for the dogs,” she said.

Keri Nutter rocks.

The 36-year-old geologist from Eagle River was recently honored by the Alaska Journal of Commerce as one of Alaska’s “Top Forty Under 40,” an annual compilation of some of the state’s top young achievers. (The Alaska Journal of Commerce is owned by the Binkley Company, which also owns the Chugiak-Eagle River Star.)

Nutter and the other honorees were recognized at a ceremony held April 27 at the Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage. She was presented the award by fellow Chugiak High alumnus John Sims, the event’s keynote speaker and a 2013 Top Forty honoree.

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