Matt Tunseth

Some of the most visible students on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus are speaking out against sexual assault.

“We’re using our voices for a good cause,” said Sarissa Lammers, a senior Nordic skier and mechanical engineering major.

A 2014 Chugiak High grad, Lammers recently helped organize a public service campaign in which UAF athletes posed for photos in their uniforms while holding signs with slogans such as “It’s On Us” and “No More.”

After only a year back in town, the Salvation Army is again retreating from Eagle River.

On Monday, the nonprofit announced it will be closing the Eagle River Family Store location it opened in April of 2017.

For years, Chugiak-Eagle River area residents have doggedly pursued a public place for their pooches to play. While the disucssions have been mostly bark, there’s finally some teeth in plans to bring a dog park to town.

A draft feasibility study on a Chugiak-Eagle River dog park was recently completed by R&M Consultants, which looked at five different sites in the area that might be suitable for a dog park. At the Eagle River/Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors meeting April 9, R&M’s Van Le said the study found two sites most suitable for a park.

A nationwide debate about gun violence arrived Friday at Chugiak High, where opinions about guns are as varied as the rugged terrain surrounding the Anchorage School District’s least urban high school.

Despite strong differences of opinion, organizers of a Friday morning school walkout deemed the event a success.

Local students will be among thousands who leave their classrooms Friday morning for a nationwide protest against gun violence.

The Anchorage Daily News reports students across the Anchorage School District will participate in the walkout, which is scheduled to coincide with the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre in Colorado.

For years, Chugiak-Eagle River area residents have doggedly pursued a public place for their pooches to play. While the discussions have been mostly bark, there’s finally some teeth in plans to bring a dog park to town.

A draft feasibility study on a Chugiak-Eagle River dog park was recently completed by R&M Consultants, which looked at five different sites in the area that might be suitable for a dog park. At the Eagle River/Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors meeting April 9, R&M’s Van Le said the study found two sites most suitable for a park.

Emma Nelson is flying high.

The Chugiak senior cleared a height of 5 feet, 8.75 inches to break Cathy Ballensky’s 1992 school record in the high jump to place second Saturday at the prestigious Oregon Relays at Hayward Field in Eugene.

“She just killed it,” said Chugiak coach Melissa Hall after the team returned to Alaska from the meet, which included some of the top athletes in the country.

Eagle River’s Pam Dreyer completed a wetter Boston Marathon than most Monday, running the 26.2-mile course in a personal best 3 hours, 31 minutes and 18 seconds to place 2,012nd in the women’s division.

“The 122nd Boston Marathon is a dream come true for this retired hockey player who loathed running any distance during my playing days,” Dreyer (@pkdreyer) wrote in an Instagram post after the race.

A 1999 Chugiak High graduate, the 36-year-old Dreyer is a former U.S. Olympic women’s hockey goalie who won a bronze medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy.

For decades, Henry Powell “Chip” Gallagher Jr. was a mainstay of the Chugiak-Eagle River hockey community.

Thanks to the efforts of some Alaska hockey officials, he’ll remain a visible part of that community for years to come.

A plan is in the works to name the officials’ dressing room at the Harry J. McDonald Center after Gallagher, who died in 2016.

“He was just a great guy,” Mac Center manager Reid McDonald told the Eagle River/Chugiak Board of Supervisors earlier this month.

“You may ask, how did this tradition start?”

— “Tradition,” Fiddler on the Roof

 

Back in the early 1980s, a cadre of bleary-eyed coaches chugged coffee before class at Chugiak High. One morning, the men were joined by the school’s new orchestra teacher Philip Burch, a man whose quick wit and genial grin had quickly gained him entry into the gruff group. As the men shot the breeze, the music teacher took out his bow and started to play.

There was a fiddler in the group.

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