Matt Tunseth

The University of Alaska Anchorage is vacating its campus in Eagle River.

UAA chancellor Cathy Sandeen sent an email to campus faculty and staff Friday saying the university is not renewing its lease in the Eagle Center building.

“…we have decided not to renew the lease on the existing Chugiak-Eagle River Campus building,” Sandeen wrote. “Spring and summer classes will continue as planned in the building, but beginning in fall 2019 UAA will offer classes in available Anchorage School District facilities in Eagle River.”

Police took a man into custody Friday after a standoff in Eagle River in which the man allegedly backed his vehicle atop a police patrol car parked in the man’s driveway.

According to the Anchorage Police Department, officers first responded to the 20500 block of Eagle River Road for a reportedly suicidal person. Police said they arrived to find a man was barricaded inside his home and had injured himself with a knife.

Moments after celebrating their biggest win of the season Thursday, all Chugiak’s players wanted to do Thursday was talk about the little things.

“We are able to find the little, small happinesses,” said Chugiak junior Chasity Horn, who scored a game-high 29 points as the Mustangs knocked off West Valley 69-66 in the opening round of the ASAA/First National Bank Alaska Girls Class 4A State Basketball Tournament at the Alaska Airlines Center in Anchorage.

Anchorage School Board members have approved a $36.3 million plan to fix two Eagle River schools that suffered heavy damage in the Nov. 30, 2018 earthquake.

At its Monday meeting, the board voted 6-0 with one absent to endorse a plan previously adopted by an ad hoc committee formed to make recommendations for the future of Gruening Middle School and Eagle River Elementary, which have been closed since the magnitude 7.1 quake.

Local author Monica Devine will hold a reading of her new memoir “Water Mask,” on Sunday, March 17, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Jitters Coffee Shop in Eagle River. She’ll also hold a second signing April 27.

Devine is a retired speech therapist whose work took her all over Alaska. Her book is a collection of 15 stories detailing her life and experiences.

One year ago, Anchorage Economic Development Corp. CEO Bill Popp told the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce that the Alaska economy was on the verge of coming out of a recession.

That’s still the case. Maybe.

Popp told the chamber last week that he still believes that Alaska economy is on the upswing, but said uncertainty over the state’s budget situation makes forecasting the future even trickier than normal.

After sweating out a state tournament berth Sunday, Chugiak girls basketball coach Ryan Hales said there’s no reason why the Mustangs can’t now put some serious pressure on the rest of the field.

“I really like our chances,” said Hales, whose team learned it had received the second and final at-large bid to the Class 4A girls tournament during a Sunday night special broadcast life online.

Willow’s JP Norris was the big winner Saturday at the Chugiak Dog Mushers Association’s Purebred Spring Fling races at the CDMA trails at Beach Lake Park in Chugiak.

Norris won the 8-dog (12-mile) and 6-dog (6-mile) races at the event, which attracted eight teams of Siberian Huskies to the association’s trails on Beach Lake Road.

Norris’s wife Kari Skogen finished second in both the 8-dog and 6-dog races, with Wasilla’s Wayne Curtis third in the 8-dog race and Tom Schonberger third in the 6-dog.

Emile Toledanu won the 4-dog race by just over a minute.

A committee tasked with making recommendations to the Anchorage School Board endorsed a plan Friday to fix a pair of Eagle River schools damaged by the Nov. 30, 2018 earthquake.

The estimated cost of fixing Gruening Middle School and Eagle River Elementary is $36.3 million — about a third of what it would cost to demolish and replace the two facilities, according to estimates provided by the Anchorage School District based on preliminary engineering reports.

Anchorage schools will not be required to play the national anthem and the “Alaska State Flag Song” at the start of each school week after the Anchorage School Board decided it needs more time to study a board policy revision that board member Dave Donley believes will foster more patriotism in students.

“There’s so few things that hold us together as a nation,” Donley told the board before it voted 4-3 Monday evening to return his proposed policy revision to the board’s governance committee.

Pages