Matt Tunseth

In an effort to gain local support for a proposed homeless veterans housing facility, the chairman of the group behind the project made a swing through Eagle River last week.

Ric Davidge, chairman of the Alaska Veterans Foundation, met with the Eagle River Valley and Eagle River community councils, where he laid out his vision for the facility to potential neighbors.

“Our mission is very simple: Do what no one else will do for veterans,” Davidge told the Eagle River Community Council at its June 14 meeting.

The sky’s no limit for Chugiak’s Michael Connelly.

The 16-year-old mountain running phenom broke the 17-and-under age group record Sunday during his fifth-place run at the Robert Spurr Memorial Hill Climb on Bird Ridge.

“I’m very excited,” said Connelly, who completed the 3,400-foot climb to the summit in 41 minutes, 40 seconds to place fifth overall.

Red, white and blue were on full display Thursday outside the Eagle River Lions Club, where more than 50 people stood in the bright sunshine to take part in a patriotic celebration of the nation’s banner. From the red of the Boy Scouts’ neckerchierf to the puffy white clouds to the bright blue sky overhead, the day was ideal for celebrating the nation’s colors.

“The whole point is Americanism,” said Lodge 2682 exalted ruler Ted “Raven” Palmer after the half-hour ceremony, which included patriotic songs, an opening prayer and messages of patriotism from club members.

Teams of racers began what some called “the worst game of tag ever” Friday on the shores of Mirror Lake, where runners embarked on a 175-mile trek expected to end sometime Saturday at Waterfront Park in Seward.

The second-annual Alaska Relay features teams of as many as 12 runners alternating legs along the route. The race winds south through Chugiak-Eagle River, Anchorage, Girdwood and onto the Kenai Peninsula. Racers travel in vans, leapfrogging each other as runners alternate running and resting over the course of the grueling event.

Rising to a height of 3,218 feet, Mount Baldy is Chugiak-Eagle River’s backyard playground. On any given summer day, dozens of cars line the sides of Skyline Drive, where the trail begins near the site of the Old Wallace Homestead. The hike provides a gateway into Chugach State Park, and offers both a quick day hike or longer excursions toward the peaks beyond, including Blacktail Rocks, Roundtop and Vista Peak.

Gardeners are having a blooming good time in Chief Alex Park, where ongoing renovations aimed at sprucing up the downtown Eagle River landmark are in full swing.

“All the flowers are in,” said Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce executive director Debbie Rinckey last week.

Parks and rec board members are slowly walking a dog parks plan forward in spite of loud, persistent howls of opposition from a small group of neighbors who live near a proposed park site in downtown Eagle River.

Eagle River High School didn’t have to look far to find its new principal.

“I live three miles away,” said Tim Helvey, who was confirmed by the Anchorage School Board to replace Marty Lang earlier this month.

Not only does Helvey live in Eagle River with his wife and two boys, he spent the last school year just up the Glenn Highway at Eagle River’s friendly rival Chugiak.

“I loved Chugiak, the community there was awesome,” said the 47-year-old, who taught social studies in Bristol Bay and Ninilchik before becoming an administrator.

Good things come to those who wait.

After losing three straight ABL games following a season-opening win, the Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks treated their home fans to a true gem Monday night.

Chinooks starter Jared Reklaitis thrilled fans by taking a no-hitter into the top of the ninth inning in the Alaska Baseball League team’s home opener against the Mat-Su Miners, losing the bid with one out in the ninth on a single by Brayden Merritt.

After a day’s skiing on the steep slopes of Arctic Valley, it’s not uncommon for skiers and snowboarders to gather in the slopeside Alpenglow Lodge to swap tales of fresh powder over a glass of wine or beer. It’s a tradition that links the small nonprofit ski area with lodges from Alaska to the Alps.

“Apres ski is something that’s a part of ski culture all over the world,” said Arctic Valley general manager John Robinson-Wilson last week.

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