Military News

The continuous 24-hour operational readiness exercise, Polar Force 13-3, came to a close Monday after a week of evaluating Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s Air Forces deployment capabilities, despite weather complications.

Editor’s note: The following is part of a series of stories about members of the Army’s 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division injured in combat during the 3,500-member “Spartan” brigade’s 10-month deployment to Afghanistan, which ended in Oct. 2012.

 

By helping his fellow soldiers heal their war wounds, Army Master Sergeant Marcus McClain is learning to deal with his own.

A pilot from Eagle River has reached new heights in his career with the U.S. Air Force.

Lt. Col. Rob “Grinch” Finch is commander of the 430th Expeditionary Electronic Combat Squadron, which has been operating in Afghanistan since 2009.

“I’ve been out here as detachment commander for about five months, ever since they activated the squadron,” Finch said by phone from Afghanistan recently.

Loud barks could be heard yards away as 673d Security Forces Squadron dog handlers prepared their assigned dogs for standard dog training at the Eagleglen golf course on JBER.

“Certain requirements are levied when it comes to qualifying as a military dog-handler,” said Tech Sgt. Scott Heise, 673d Security Squadron military dog kennel master.

Editor’s note: The following is the first in a series of stories about members of the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division injured in combat during the 3,500-member “Spartan” brigade’s 10-month deployment to Afghanistan, which lasted from Dec. 2011 to Oct. 2012.

 

For Army Staff Sergeant Justin Grimm, getting shot at is all in a day’s work.

Editor’s note: The following is the first in a series of stories about members of the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division injured in combat during the 3,500-member “Spartan” brigade’s 10-month deployment to Afghanistan, which lasted from Dec. 2011 to Oct. 2012.

 

On June 1, 2012 Sgt. Maj. Michael Van Engen had just finished eating lunch in the mess hall at Forward Operating Base Salerno in Southern Afghanistan when all hell broke loose.

What’s it take to be a military wife?

Just ask Meghan Wieten-Scott.

Military Spouse magazine recently named Wieten-Scott as Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s Military Spouse of the Year. She’s also in the running for the overall Army Spouse of the Year. That winner will be announced today (Thursday, Feb. 21).

Should Wieten-Scott win the Army branch award, she’d be up for the overall Military Spouse of the Year honor.

Unbeknownst to Wieten-Scott, her friend and fellow military wife, Jess Paden, nominated her for the award.

A 25-year-old Palmer man is facing federal charges after he allegedly crashed his pick-up truck through the Boniface gate of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson around midnight Jan. 19.

According to a complaint filed in U.S. District Court, Kyle Hansen illegally entered through the Boniface gate, then led security officials on a chase around the base before crashing through the gate and fleeing. He was captured at around 9 p.m. at the Eagle River home of his friend Shawn McKenna after Anchorage Police received an anonymous tip.

I always wanted to come to Alaska. I will admit to pushing my husband to put Alaska high on his wish list. I didn’t know much about the frontier state. But I did know that almost everyone I talked to who was stationed in Alaska loved it. The one exception was my father, who isn’t a big fan of snow. Driving to Alaska, on my way to live here for at least three years, I was quite ignorant to what life here would be like.

In the 1980s, a famous recruiting commercial claimed the U.S. Army does “more before 9 a.m. than most people do all day.”

That’s still the case.

Well before dawn on the morning of Jan. 31, more than 200 members of the Army’s 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment arrived under cover of darkness at the foot of Arctic Valley Road. Carrying 35-pound rucksacks and decked out in their camouflage combat uniforms, the men briefly listened to instructions from their platoon leaders before springing into action.

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