Movie Reviews

Steven Spielberg’s “Bridge of Spies,” much like its misunderstood litigator, is a film that plays the long game. This complex Cold War drama soaked in shadows, blues, greys and furrowed brows, is a slow burn that challenges the audience to trust where it’s going.

Parenting involves countless mundane decisions — dozens a day. But as any parent knows, the potential for tragedy stemming from a wrong decision is never far from the surface of the mind. What if they go out and get hit by a car? What if I look away and they drown in the current? What if they get kidnapped?

“Live in the moment.” It’s a pat piece of advice we all get at some point in our lives, usually when we’re being anxious or obsessive about something we can’t control.

But living in the moment can be overrated — especially when everyone else is suddenly looking to the future. That’s the predicament addressed in “The Spectacular Now,” a pure gem of a teen romance graced with sparkling acting by its young leads, Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley, as high-school seniors falling awkwardly in love.

There are really three movie stars headlining “The Internship”: Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson, and Google. Actually, it’s a surprise Google doesn’t get top billing over the humans, so adoringly is the company displayed.

But if you can get past this Mother of All Product Placements, you’ll likely find yourself chuckling a lot during this silly but warm-hearted film, directed by Shawn Levy. Sure, it could be shorter, the script less predictable, the action (much) more believable.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — You have to at least give “Scary Movie 5” points for timeliness. This latest installment of the horror movie spoof franchise manages to deliver parodies of movies as recent as last week’s “Evil Dead” remake, not to mention one that hasn’t even been made yet (“Fifty Shades of Gray”). But those points are immediately subtracted by the fact that this Wayans-less installment doesn’t manage to wrest a single laugh from any one of them.

In countless films about emergencies, crimes and police work, the 911 dispatcher is but a bit player, an anonymous, robotic voice briefly heard on the other end of a breathless call made by our movie’s main players.

But in “The Call,” the 911 operator gets a starring role. It would seem to be long overdue, since Halle Berry is apparently among their ranks.

“The Last Stand” is the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie you didn’t even realize you wanted to see.

This is the action superstar’s first leading role in a decade, having left acting to serve as the governor of California and whatnot, and while it may not have occurred to you to miss him during that time, it’s still surprisingly good to see him on the big screen again.

“Gangster Squad,” a pulpy, violent tale of cops and mobsters in 1949 Los Angeles, rides an uncomfortable line between outlandishness and outright parody, and it’s difficult to tell which is director Ruben Fleischer’s intention. Which is a problem.

While the film wallows in period detail and has some sporadic moments of amusing banter, it’s mostly flashy, empty and cacophonous, and it woefully wastes a strong cast led by Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone in barely developed, one-note roles.

Until the very end, she is described as “The Girl.”

Even after a relentless, decade-long pursuit that leads to the daring midnight raid of Osama bin Laden’s compound, even as she unzips the body bag to verify that the bloody corpse inside is indeed that of the slain al-Qaida leader, Jessica Chastain’s CIA officer character is defined primarily by her femininity in this male-dominated world.

Writer-director Andrew Dominik’s “Killing Them Softly” is an incredibly stylish genre exercise set in the world of mobsters, junkies and lowlifes, but it’s also trying incredibly hard to be About Something.

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