A death sentence has been handed down for a pair of trash-eating brown bears in Eagle River.

“They’re going to be euthanized,” said Alaska Department of Fish and Game assistant Anchorage area biologist Cory Stantorf.

Jordan Wharton is tearing up the Alaska Baseball League.

The Indiana Wesleyan University and Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks infielder is currently leading the ABL with a .441 batting average and 15 hits through the first nine games of the season. Wharton’s hot start continued during a recent three-game series with the Peninsula Oilers that saw the 6-foot-1 righty from Akron, Ohio pick up six hits, including a homerun.

A three-hour standoff between an armed man and police ended with the man being Tasered and bitten by a police dog before being taken into custody.

According to the Anchorage Police Department, James Fredrickrock, 37, was arrested just before midnight on Saturday, June 16. According to APD, a drunken Fredrickrock showed up at his ex-girlfriend’s home on Regency Drive shortly before 9 p.m. armed with a handgun. He allegedly pointed the weapon at her and made suicidal threats.

The woman and a child were able to get out of the home without being hurt, police said.

In an effort to gain local support for a proposed homeless veterans housing facility, the chairman of the group behind the project made a swing through Eagle River last week.

Ric Davidge, chairman of the Alaska Veterans Foundation, met with the Eagle River Valley and Eagle River community councils, where he laid out his vision for the facility to potential neighbors.

“Our mission is very simple: Do what no one else will do for veterans,” Davidge told the Eagle River Community Council at its June 14 meeting.

The sky’s no limit for Chugiak’s Michael Connelly.

The 16-year-old mountain running phenom broke the 17-and-under age group record Sunday during his fifth-place run at the Robert Spurr Memorial Hill Climb on Bird Ridge.

“I’m very excited,” said Connelly, who completed the 3,400-foot climb to the summit in 41 minutes, 40 seconds to place fifth overall.

Red, white and blue were on full display Thursday outside the Eagle River Lions Club, where more than 50 people stood in the bright sunshine to take part in a patriotic celebration of the nation’s banner. From the red of the Boy Scouts’ neckerchierf to the puffy white clouds to the bright blue sky overhead, the day was ideal for celebrating the nation’s colors.

“The whole point is Americanism,” said Lodge 2682 exalted ruler Ted “Raven” Palmer after the half-hour ceremony, which included patriotic songs, an opening prayer and messages of patriotism from club members.

Teams of racers began what some called “the worst game of tag ever” Friday on the shores of Mirror Lake, where runners embarked on a 175-mile trek expected to end sometime Saturday at Waterfront Park in Seward.

The second-annual Alaska Relay features teams of as many as 12 runners alternating legs along the route. The race winds south through Chugiak-Eagle River, Anchorage, Girdwood and onto the Kenai Peninsula. Racers travel in vans, leapfrogging each other as runners alternate running and resting over the course of the grueling event.

Rising to a height of 3,218 feet, Mount Baldy is Chugiak-Eagle River’s backyard playground. On any given summer day, dozens of cars line the sides of Skyline Drive, where the trail begins near the site of the Old Wallace Homestead. The hike provides a gateway into Chugach State Park, and offers both a quick day hike or longer excursions toward the peaks beyond, including Blacktail Rocks, Roundtop and Vista Peak.

Items in the Police Briefs are taken from the Anchorage Police Department’s online crime mapping system. Details about individual events are provided by the department’s public information office. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

Truck crash results in arrest

Gardeners are having a blooming good time in Chief Alex Park, where ongoing renovations aimed at sprucing up the downtown Eagle River landmark are in full swing.

“All the flowers are in,” said Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce executive director Debbie Rinckey last week.

Parks and rec board members are slowly walking a dog parks plan forward in spite of loud, persistent howls of opposition from a small group of neighbors who live near a proposed park site in downtown Eagle River.

The Eagle River Valley Community Council will hold a special meeting Wednesday, June 13 at 7 p.m. in the Eagle River Town Center meeting room.

The purpose of the meeting is to discuss two items: an update on the proposed Braendel Creek Subdivision and a presentation on the proposed Veteran Village project.

For more information, visit communitycouncils.org.

Eagle River High School didn’t have to look far to find its new principal.

“I live three miles away,” said Tim Helvey, who was confirmed by the Anchorage School Board to replace Marty Lang earlier this month.

Not only does Helvey live in Eagle River with his wife and two boys, he spent the last school year just up the Glenn Highway at Eagle River’s friendly rival Chugiak.

“I loved Chugiak, the community there was awesome,” said the 47-year-old, who taught social studies in Bristol Bay and Ninilchik before becoming an administrator.

The American Legion baseball season is heating up, with teams now well into the 16-team league schedule.

Chugiak improved to 2-2 in the league and 3-4 overall with a split June 9 against Juneau in Juneau. In the opener, the Post 33 Mustangs fell 7-4 before rallying for a 5-1 win in the second game of the doubleheader. The teams also played a nonleague game Sunday, with Juneau taking the series finale 3-2.

Good things come to those who wait.

After losing three straight ABL games following a season-opening win, the Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks treated their home fans to a true gem Monday night.

Chinooks starter Jared Reklaitis thrilled fans by taking a no-hitter into the top of the ninth inning in the Alaska Baseball League team’s home opener against the Mat-Su Miners, losing the bid with one out in the ninth on a single by Brayden Merritt.

A snack shack bandit has struck the Knik Little League.

“We’re furious!” the local Little League wrote on its Facebook page Monday after someone broke into the snack shack at Eagle River Lions Park on Eagle River Road sometime over the weekend.

According to the league, someone broke a lock off the snack shack, entered the building and stole petty cash, a karaoke speaker and a microphone as well as damaging the inside of the facility.

After a day’s skiing on the steep slopes of Arctic Valley, it’s not uncommon for skiers and snowboarders to gather in the slopeside Alpenglow Lodge to swap tales of fresh powder over a glass of wine or beer. It’s a tradition that links the small nonprofit ski area with lodges from Alaska to the Alps.

“Apres ski is something that’s a part of ski culture all over the world,” said Arctic Valley general manager John Robinson-Wilson last week.

The first class of seniors to spend all four years of high school at Chugiak High are planning a 50th reunion.

The school’s class of 1968 will host a picnic lunch Thursday, June 21 from noon to 4 p.m. at the Beach Lake Chalet on Birchwood Loop. The event will also feature a tour of the school from 2 to 3 p.m. with CHS principal (and graduate) Megan Hatswell.

Alumni from as far away as Florida and California have confirmed their attendance at the event, which is welcoming any graduates from 1965 to 1973.

Items in the Police Briefs are taken from the Anchorage Police Department’s online crime mapping system. Details about individual events are provided by the department’s public information office. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

Baggie found, drugs not

On May 29 at around 4:52 p.m., police were called to a location on Crested Butte Drive by a citizen who found a baggie they thought contained drugs. Police said the substance tested negative for meth and cocaine. Case closed.

Every spring, the first flowers to emerge in my garden are the primulas. Primulaceae is the name taken from the Italian word for spring, (primavera).

Frequently found in the Himalayas and western China and in the northern countrysides of Europe, this plant prefers the cool, damp conditions of the alpine mountain regions and is well-suited for us in Alaska.

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