Things just never got on track for the Chugiak flag football team, whose season ended in disappointment following a 28-14 loss to West in the opening round of the Cook Inlet Conference playoffs on Tuesday, Oct. 11.

“It’s a bit indicative of our year,” said Chugiak coach Jon Schroeder, whose team finished the season 7-8.

Chugiak had flashes of brilliance this season — the Mustangs thrashed West 33-0 in their previous meeting — but Schroeder said his squad never managed to reach its full potential on a regular basis.

Two local senior football players — one a shifty open-field specialist, the other a hulking lineman — came home with two of the Cook Inlet Conference's top four awards in voting by the league's coaches.

Eagle River's Kelechi Madubuko, a senior wide receiver/return specialist who scored 10 touchdowns this season — four on returns — was named the CIC's Utility Player of the Year and also to the first team All-CIC team as a wideout and return specialist.

Mirror Lake Middle School’s Ty Jordan doesn’t fold under pressure. Rather, he thrives on it.

Gruening Middle School had three eighth-grade girls in the top 10 at the Anchorage School District middle school cross-country running championships on Thursday, Oct. 6 at Kincaid Park. Gruening finished fourth as a team, just 10 points behind first-place Mears, which also won the sixth-grade/seventh-grade team title.

Emmie Jennings led the Colts with a time of 12 minutes, 24 seconds on the nearly 2-mile-long course to finish fifth. Julia Geskey placed eighth, followed by Dreanna Ownes in ninth.

With his ripped jeans, messy hair, earring and tennis shoes, author Anthony Pate is the first to admit he’s kind of a punk.

“I guess I don’t look like a writer,” said Pate, a sophomore at Chugiak High.

But looking like an author and being one are two different things, and Pate already has the former down cold.

Middle school isn’t easy for anyone — even pro athletes.

When professional basketball player Kelsey Griffin roamed the halls of Gruening Middle School, she wore plain clothes, went without make-up and stood taller than most of the boys in her class.

“Middle school was really hard for me,” Griffin told a couple hundred Gruening Colts on Sept. 30 in the school’s gym.

Chugiak High activities principal Kevin Theonnes has been moved and demoted for his role in an eligibility snafu that cost the school’s football team three wins and a spot in the state playoffs.

Anchorage School District Superintendent Carol Comeau said Tuesday that disciplinary action to reassign Theonnes to another school and give him a new job title was taken following Chugiak’s use of an ineligible football player this season, which led to forfeitures of three of the team’s wins.

It was an average fall day; like so many others I had a list of errands to run, being pulled in every direction and behind schedule to boot. Obeying the speed limit, but just barely, I rounded the street corner and in an instant a scene grabbed my attention. There were cars, trucks and SUVs on both sides of the road and filling up the driveway and yard of an unassuming house that I have driven by for the past twenty years.

In 2005 my husband and I had our second child, a beautiful, healthy baby girl. We were excited that our 2-year-old son was going to have a sister. A week later life changed drastically; our baby was not waking up. We rushed her to the hospital and she was admitted. For several days we did not find out what was wrong with her. She was still not waking up! Further testing gave no answers on why our infant daughter was drifting further and further away.

A fight between a trio of soldiers on an early October camping trip up the South Fork Eagle River Valley ended with one in jail and another wandering, injured and alone in miserable weather, with a massive search underway.

The victim eventually emerged early the next afternoon, dazed and suffering from head injuries and mild hypothermia, searchers said. An Alaska State Troopers helicopter lifted him to safety.

On September 23, I was hiking with a friend from the season of autumn to winter in the mountains above Eklutna Lake (Mountain Echoes, Oct. 6, 2011), and the following night I was again transported to the heights as I listened to guest pianist Haochen Zhang and the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra play a concerto by S. Rachmaninoff.

When they started the second movement, one of my favorite pieces of music, I was elevated to those places I often seek in Chugach State Park.

If you think giving up meat to become either vegan or vegetarian will destroy your chances of eating out and you’ll have to say goodbye to eating out forever—think again. This monthly column will explore the vegetarian and vegan opportunities in Eagle River and Anchorage area restaurants. It will also look at other healthy options available in area restaurants like whole grains and low fat.

The Homestead Lounge is an unassuming bar attached to a family-friendly bowling alley.

Yet in the last few months, the Homestead has been the scene of several police calls involving rowdy and sometimes-combative patrons, culminating in a Sept. 11 confrontation between a boisterous crowd and Anchorage police officers conducting a standard bar check around 10 p.m.

More local youngsters can be seen roaming the halls this school year, however, fewer students will be donning a cap and gown come May 2012.

Enrollment in Chugiak-Eagle River elementary and middle schools increased from last year, while numbers dropped at the two high schools.

Excluding Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson schools, the seven area elementary schools (Alpenglow, Birchwood ABC, Chugiak, Eagle River, Homestead, Fire Lake and Ravenwood) had a combined increase of 19 students from Sept. 30, 2010 to Sept. 30, 2011.

Chugiak High activities principal Kevin Theonnes has been moved and demoted for his role in an eligibility snafu that cost the school’s football team a spot in the playoffs.

Anchorage School District Superintendent Carol Comeau said Tuesday that disciplinary action to reassign Theonnes to another school and job title was taken following Chugiak’s use of an ineligible football player this season, which led to forfeitures of three of its wins.

Two locals — one a shifty open-field specialist, the other a hulking lineman — came home with two of the Cook Inlet Conference's top four awards in voting by the league's coaches.

Eagle River's Kelechi Madubuko, a senior wide receiver/return specialist who scored 10 touchdowns this season — four on returns — was named the CIC's Utility Player of the Year and also to the first team All-CIC team as a wideout and return man.

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The first thing you notice are the skies. They can be vast and blue or ominous and gray; they send sheets of rain that shatter the sun’s rays, with thick drops that glisten with the yellowy sheen of motor oil.

Either way they seem sprawling, powerful, inescapable, and they clearly portend an encroaching danger in “Take Shelter.”

When four Chugiak senior football players and their parents gathered outside a small meeting room at the Anchorage Hilton, they did so in hopes of salvaging a lost season and lost dreams. A few hours later, in a different part of town, they learned their dreams had died.

But did they?

Jennifer Renae Bishop,

 

 

of Eagle River, graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Excelsior College in Albany, NY.

The local Lions Clubs have a long history of helping non-profits in our community. Some of those organizations have been partners with our clubs for many years. One organization in particular is Hope Community Resources, Inc. (Hope). Hope is a non-profit organization that provides services and supports to Alaskans who experience intellectual and developmental disabilities. Hope has been around since 1968, serving our community and many others state-wide.

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