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In many ways, Adrienne Lindholm’s story is the ultimate Alaska cliche.

“I thought I’d have my Alaskan experience in one summer,” the Eagle River author said during a recent interview in Anchorage. “That was 2000, and I’ve been here ever since.”

Anchorage police responded to eight stolen vehicle reports in Chugiak-Eagle River between Sept. 24 and 30. Among the vehicles taken were two Chevy Silverados, an Acura Integra, a Polaris Razor, a Ford Taurus, a Dodge 2500, a Chevy 3500 and a Ford F-150. One vehicle contained a firearm, police said.

The rash of thefts is unusual for Eagle River, where so far there have been 64 reported stolen vehicles this year — or about one every four days — according to the department’s online crime mapping system.

Members of the South Fork Community Council will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4 in the first of five local community council meetings scheduled for this month.

The South Fork council meets at Eagle River High School on Yosemite Drive. An agenda will be available before the meeting at communitycouncils.org.

Other meetings this month include the Birchwood, Eagle River Valley, Eagle River and Chugiak councils.

Items in the Police Briefs are taken from the Anchorage Police Department’s online crime mappying system. Details about individual events are provided by the department’s public information office. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

A high-ranking executive for an Alaska oil giant believes recent discoveries more than 800 miles from downtown Eagle River could mean good news for the local business community.

“It’s a pretty exciting time for the company,” said ConocoPhillips vice president for North Slope operations and development Lisa Bruner during the Sept. 19 meeting of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce at the Eagle River Ale House.

Bruner gave an update of the company’s North Slope operations, which she said have experienced a dramatic turnaround over the past five years.

An always heartwarming event will be a little less chilly and a lot more spicy this fall.

The annual Maddy’s Run 5-kilometer run and fun run event has been moved up a month (from November to October 20), which organizer Dana Johnson thinks could benefit athletes and spectators.

“I think it will be a little more comfortable for the people out there,” Johnson said of the race, which was first run in 2015 and featured some participants running in snow boots and parkas.

They’re still looking for a place to live, but a family of three believes they’ve found a community in Eagle River after receiving an outpouring of support from locals in the aftermath of a dispiriting campsite robbery.

“It’s made it home,” said Sarah Marble Wednesday outside her temporary home at Beach Lake Park, where she and her two sons are staying in a dry cabin owned by the local Parks and Recreation department.

Don’t fear the setbacks.

It’s a little more complicated than that, but Municipality of Anchorage watershed hydrologist (and Peters Creek resident) Jeff Urbanus told the Chugiak Community Council be believes the ongoing effort to increase stream setbacks and clarify municipal wetland code is being done for the right reasons.

“The biggest reason is there is benefit to the community,” Urbanus told the council during a presentation at its Sept. 20 meeting at the Elsie Oberg Center in Chugiak.

A 30-year-old Anchorage man was arrested for drunk driving after his vehicle was stopped by a pair of fellow motorists in Eagle River.

According to Anchorage Police Department spokeswoman Renee Oistad, a patrol officer pulled over on the Old Glenn Highway at around 4:22 p.m. on Sept. 15 to check on three vehicles stopped by the side of the road.

State attorneys issued a statement Friday expaining a plea deal that allowed a man who strangled and sexually attacked a woman last year in Anchorage to walk free without serving jail time.

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