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Now that the dust is settling from Friday’s big shaker, the Anchorage fire chief wants people to check on their neighbors.

“I’m asking you guys to work through your community councils to do neighborhood welfare checks,” chief Jodie Hettrick asked Anchorage Assembly members during an emergency meeting of the assembly held Sunday at the Municipality of Anchorage’s emergency operations center in downtown Anchorage.

Friday’s earthquake may have been a boon for the producers of an upcoming PBS documentary featuring survivors of the 1964 Good Friday quake.

“I did send them an email asking if they did that for PR,” joked Eagle River’s Dan Kendall, whose story is chronicled in Season 2 of “We’ll Meet Again,” a series executive produced and presented by Ann Curry.

The documentary brings people together who haven’t seen each other in many years. In Kendall’s case, he was reunited with former Little League teammate and neighbor Rudolph “Bucky” Svein, who now lives in Washington.

The lights came back up before the sun did Saturday in Chugiak-Eagle River, where at 4 a.m. Matanuska Electric Association announced power had been restored to all areas following an outage that began with a magnitude 7.0 earthquake that ripped directly through the cooperative’s power grid.

Chugiak-Eagle River residents scrambled to clean up and assess the damage after a major earthquake struck the area Friday morning.

Damage was widespread across the area, with broken windows, broken pipes and major damage to the Glenn Highway between Eklutna and Mirror Lake.

The quake was reportedly a magnitude 7.0 and centered about 30 miles south of Palmer — directly across Knik Arm from Chugiak. There were no immediate reports of serious injuries, though reports were still coming in Friday.

With its mix of urban living and rugged terrain, the Chugiak-Eagle River area is in many ways an ideal representation of issues facing neighboring Chugach State Park.

“This area is a great example of a Petri dish of some of the issues we have parkwide,” said Chugach superintendent Kurt Hensel during the Nov. 19 meeting of the Eagle River-Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors.

Items in the Police Briefs are taken from the Anchorage Police Department’s online crime mapping system. Details about individual events are provided by the department’s public information office. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

UPDATE:

On Tuesday prosecutors said charges were dropped against the 44-year-old man arrested for allegedly pointing a gun at a women after determining there was insufficient evidence to prove the case.

ORIGINAL STORY:

A 39-year-old Anchorage man was arrested on Thanksgiving after he allegedly pulled a knife on an Eagle River convenience store clerk.

According to police, officers were called to the Tesoro on the Old Glenn Highway at around 10:25 p.m. on Nov. 22 for a report of a robbery. When they arrived, the clerk told officers he tried to confront Thomas R. Emblom for allegedly putting a candy bar in his pocket. Rather than removing the candy bar from his pocket, Emblom instead took out a knife, police said. The clerk backed away and Emblom left the store, kicking the door on the way out.

Chugiak’s Amy Demboski will be stepping away from her position on the Anchorage Assembly to take a job as deputy chief of staff for Gov.-elect Mike Dunleavy.

“I am going to be working in the governor’s office,” Demboski said on her afternoon radio show Monday. “And I’ve said this for a long time, if I chose to leave the Anchorage Assembly I would only do so if I truly believed it could help more Alaskans than just the people in my district. It has been an incredible privilege to serve the people of Chugiak-Eagle River. I’m just truly humbled by the opportunity.”

What do Alaskans do when it’s blowing outside with freezing rain? If you’re Eagle River author Marc Cameron, you work on your next Tom Clancy/Jack Ryan novel.

Municipal officials are in talks with an Oklahoma nonprofit that could result in a big windfall for Chugiak-Eagle River taxpayers and a permanent buffer zone for Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

According to Eagle River-Chugiak Parks and Recreation Department director John Rodda, the department was recently contacted by the Tulsa-based Compatible Lands Foundation (CLF), which according to its website purchases conservation easements “from willing landowners, prohibiting incompatible land uses but allowing open space activities such as farming, ranching, and hunting.”

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