More snow expected for Martin Luther King Day

National Weather Service predicts half of foot by Monday afternoon
Monday, January 16, 2017 - 10:23

Winter recreation fans are getting a second gift over the holiday weekend.

The National Weather Service is predicting a blast of snow will hit Southcentral Alaska beginning Sunday night. On Sunday afternoon, the service issued a Winter Weather Advisory for the Anchorage area, with the heaviest snowfall expected on the Eastside of Anchorage and the Chugiak-Eagle River corridor along the Glenn Highway. According to the alert, 4 to 8 inches of snow are expected to fall overnight Jan. 15-16, 2017. The storm is expected to last through Martin Luther King Jr. Day, with the advisory in effect until 4 p.m Monday.

The storm is expected to bring snow to much of Southcentral Alaska and into the Interior. The NWS said up to nine inches could hit Palmer and Wasilla, with a foot or more expected in Hatcher Pass in the Talkeetna Mountains.

The snowstorm is the second of the holiday weekend. On Friday night, between 6 inches and a foot of snow fell across the Anchorage and Eagle River areas, with the greatest totals reported at higher elevations and in the Eagle River Valley. Volunteers at the Eagle River Nature Center said Friday night's storm dumped 14 inches on the center's trails, which are open daily to hikers, snowshoers and Nordic skiers. For more on the center, visit www.ernc.org.

The heaviest snow is expected Monday morning, and the advisory said driving conditions will likely be difficult areawide.

Although the storm could make driving difficult for Anchorage-bound commuters, its impact on traffic will be eased by the MLK Day holiday. Schools, state and federal offices, and some private business will be closed in observance of the civil rights leader, who was born Jan. 15, 1929 and assassinated April 4, 1968. The federal holiday was established in 1983 when it was signed into law by president Ronald Reagan.

For more information on the Weather Service's forecast, visit www.weather.gov/arh/

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