AMY ARMSTRONG

Frank Cormier needs help.

The long-time Chugiak resident well-known around these parts as the owner of Creative Tile has been on the waiting list for a kidney transplant for nearly two years.

Just recently, Cormier’s cousin’s husband passed all the necessary testing to become a donor. The surgery is set for Sept. 15 at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Wash.

It sounds like a medical dream come true. Some people wait on a transplant list for an appropriate organ for years and even decades.

He is known as the principal who tweets.

When David Legg, principal at Chugiak High School, shows up at various school-related events, academics aren’t usually the first thing his colleagues ask him about.

Instead, they pick his brain about Twitter.

He names at least 12 other principals statewide that didn’t just ask for his advice about the social media platform; they had Legg help them set up their Twitter accounts and teach them how to tweet.

This school year starts Legg’s third year making tweeting a regular part of his day.

Her Facebook friends joke that Katie Puterbaugh is going to force the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to recount the number of fish in the Kenai and Russian Rivers.

The avid fisherwoman from Eagle River regularly has posted – as in nearly every day for the last two months – photos of herself with a day’s limit of fish neatly floating in the water in front of her.

In the photos, Puterbaugh is sharply clad in chest waders that make her look more like a model for outdoor adventures than a mom successfully filling the family freezer.

Anchorage School District Superintendent Ed Graff headed an early evening meeting last Thursday updating parents and teachers on the aftermath of the Aug. 1 playground fire at Alpenglow Elementary School. More than 30 people attended.

The Anchorage Police Department investigation continues, Graff said, and the case is still open. A 14-year-old is in custody. The suspect’s intent in setting the fire remains undetermined.

Nationwide, school districts are advertising open positions and finding a shortage of qualified and available educators as the school year starts, and the Anchorage School District is seeing its own version of this national trend.

Two weeks ago, more than 200 positions were left vacant. That gap closed to fewer than 100 positions the week before school started, according to the district’s online employment listings.

Yet the gap remains and district officials say they’re concerned.

Nationwide, school districts are advertising open positions and finding a shortage of qualified and available educators as the school year starts, and the Anchorage School District is seeing its own version of this national trend.

Two weeks ago, more than 200 positions were left vacant. That gap closed to fewer than 100 positions the week before school started, according to the district’s online employment listings.

Yet the gap remains and district officials say they’re concerned.

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