AMY ARMSTRONG

Three free performances of the Nutcracker: The Musical serve as a holiday gift to the community from the Alaska Fine Arts Academy.

Performances are: Friday, Dec. 4, at 5 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 5, at 11 a.m. at the AFAA and Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 4:30 p.m. at the Chugiak-Eagle River Library.

“It is our gift to say thank-you for all of the support in 2015 and our contribution to the Merry Merchant Munch,” Holly Lindsay, AFAA executive director, said.

It features the AFAA Children’s Choir and is directed by Lindsay.

It is A-OK with local business owners if it is those delectable goodies that attracted you to the Merry Merchant Munch Dec. 4 and 5.

At least you are in their store and not one elsewhere.

While you are snacking, they unashamedly work to get your economic attention.

The holiday shopping season — just like for the big box and online retailers – is indeed the make-it-or-break-it time for local business owners.

Investigators from Anchorage Animal Care and Control have yet to locate the owner of two larger-sized dogs that attacked a smaller 15-pound dog on Nov. 15 near the Coronado Park Senior Village in Eagle River. The canine was later euthanized due to the severity of its sustained injuries.

A group of local elementary students did something most adults never have or will.

They intentionally moved out of their comfort zone and fed the homeless hanging out on the downtown Anchorage streets outside of the Brother Francis Shelter.

Chugiak High School Principal David Legg dislocated his hip last Friday during a fire alarm evacuation of the school during second period.

The Star talked with him Monday morning as he prepped for an afternoon appointment with an Anchorage orthopedic specialist. Legg sounded upbeat and said he planned to return to work on Tuesday unless the doctor tells him otherwise.

As Legg describes it, he “just took a spill,” on the stairs. He said the surface was not slippery and he was not pushed by others while evacuating the building. “It really was nothing spectacular.”

Chugiak High School has some smart athletes.

Eight of the school’s fall sports teams won grade point average awards at their respective regional competitions. The gymnastics team earned the top 2015 regional academic award for the third straight year.

Anchorage’s First Lady Mara Kimmel wants the Chugiak-Eagle River to be an active participant in the municipality’s first-ever immigrant/refugee census planned for next spring.

She addressed members of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce on Nov. 18 less than a week after the terrorists’ attacks in France that are alleged to be planned — at least in part — by Syrian terrorists.

He’s chasing news stories all over the country and Todd Walker couldn’t be happier.

The former Eagle River resident and KTUU television morning anchor left Alaska in 2012 for on-air television reporting stints in Denver, Colo., and Nashville, Tenn. He is now a national correspondent for the E.W. Scripps Company, a position he began the first part of October.

The new 2016 Miss Chugiak-Eagle River hopes she is invited to numerous community events at which she can perform her talent and talk about her platform of raising mental health awareness.

“A goal as Miss Chugiak-Eagle River is to perform my talent,” Harper King said. “It’s something new for me and I enjoy doing it so hopefully there are opportunities for me to perform and promote my platform.”

For her talent, King played the ukulele and sang, “Can’t Help Falling in Love.”

“Weekend College” at the University of Alaska-Anchorage Chugiak-Eagle River campus is slated to offer three-hour class sessions Sunday evenings beginning with the spring 2016 semester in January.

It is yet another expansion of the campus’ offerings at times when administrators say students are available.

Fall semester 2015 featured classes on Friday and Saturday nights.

Pages